No To LGBTQ Adoption Discrimination

A foster care and adoption #LicenseToDiscriminate measure was added into a health and human services funding bill in the House Appropriations Committee on Wednesday and passed by a vote of 29-23.  Named the Aderholt Amendment, it would protect foster care and adoption agencies that refuse services to LGBTQ and other couples based on their religious beliefs.  The amendment specifically says adoption agencies declining a child welfare service "based on sincerely held religious beliefs or moral convictions" could not be punished.

 
Discrimination is not a family value.  We need your help to tell Congress:  NO ADOPTION DISCRIMINATION in the 2019 appropriations bill!  

Click here to email and call your Representatives and Senators and tell them the Aderholt adoption discrimination amendment MUST BE REMOVED from the health and human services appropriations bill!  We will keep you updated as appropriations measures move in the House and Senate.  Thank you.

 

 
 

 

 

3 comments

  • Beth

    Beth Long Beach, CA

    I work for a government agency that places children who have been removed from their parents due to abuse and/or neglect. We have many wonderful same sex families we place children with. In addition, we have many wonderful same sex adoptive families we rely on. The families win and, most importantly, these children win. Allowing agencies to legally discriminate against same sex families is a travesty! Qualified people who want to become a forever home for children who cannot be returned to their biological parents are a resource. This will result in the loss of willing adoptive families and the ones who will suffer the most from this are the children. Adoption policy should have everything to do with what's best for the children. The beliefs of people who work at the agency should never be allowed to dictate whether a child will be place with a particular family or not. If the family has passed the qualification process, it is blatant discrimination to not place with them. And in the end, the children loose. Again.

    I work for a government agency that places children who have been removed from their parents due to abuse and/or neglect. We have many wonderful same sex families we place children with. In addition, we have many wonderful same sex adoptive families we rely on. The families win and, most importantly, these children win. Allowing agencies to legally discriminate against same sex families is a travesty! Qualified people who want to become a forever home for children who cannot be returned to their biological parents are a resource. This will result in the loss of willing adoptive families and the ones who will suffer the most from this are the children. Adoption policy should have everything to do with what's best for the children. The beliefs of people who work at the agency should never be allowed to dictate whether a child will be place with a particular family or not. If the family has passed the qualification process, it is blatant discrimination to not place with them. And in the end, the children loose. Again.

  • Jennifer

    Jennifer Orange, California

    With thousands of religions in the world, where does this stop? Are agencies allowed to fire people who have religious beliefs that get in the way of a child finding a home? Of course not. I've been working in civil litigation over 29 years and this just smacks of simple discrimination wrapped in religious sheep's clothing. If this passes, it's going to tie up in the courts for years to determine what's reasonable for every single transaction tied to a religious belief. And guess who it hurts the most - the children who need a safe place. I guess they can stay in cages until it all gets sorted out.

    With thousands of religions in the world, where does this stop? Are agencies allowed to fire people who have religious beliefs that get in the way of a child finding a home? Of course not. I've been working in civil litigation over 29 years and this just smacks of simple discrimination wrapped in religious sheep's clothing. If this passes, it's going to tie up in the courts for years to determine what's reasonable for every single transaction tied to a religious belief. And guess who it hurts the most - the children who need a safe place. I guess they can stay in cages until it all gets sorted out.

  • Andrea

    Andrea Seal Beach

    So, I ask you, who is braver: the soldier who loses his mind and safely makes up up a hill under enemy fire only to arrive safely at the top by luck, or the soldier who remains fully aware and fights bit by bit to survive the enemy fire despite terror and fear? T his is a parallel situation. Any heterosexual couple can "get lucky", technically creating a baby, without forethought, love, preparation, or even desire for that life. Most heterosexual couples can, happily or unhappily, become parents by pure happenstance. For a homosexual couple to become parents...? THAT has to be yearned for, and THAT is where you see the absolute determination to try anything, to give anything, to pay any emotional or monetary price for the joy and honor of parenting. The heterosexual couple enjoys the privilege of being either soldier in this analogy. As a general rule, a heterosexual couple can "arrive at the top of the hill" (i.e., become pregnant) with either approach. However, homosexual partners have no privilege; if they are going to be parents, they have to remain focused, disciplined, and negotiate every bit of the way in order to survive the process. Many times, they have to undergo painful medical procedures and to want to be parents almost as much as they want life itself. Yes, there are great parents and awful parents of both persuasions, but no one can accuse a gay couple of having gotten pregnant "by mistake." In my extensive personal observations of gay penetrating, the children are often better communicators, more emphatic and more socially advanced than children from a homes that are heterosexual on the outside but struggling with impoverished relationships on the inside. Simply put, most of the gay parents I know are incontestably excellent and engaged parents, per a number of measures, and have responsive, socially-conscious and confident children. Many of the straight parents I know are struggling with how to guide with their teens, how to manage conflicts regarding gender roles, how to keep their daughters safe and their sons from acting out, and how to communicate openly and without fear.

    So, I ask you, who is braver: the soldier who loses his mind and safely makes up up a hill under enemy fire only to arrive safely at the top by luck, or the soldier who remains fully aware and fights bit by bit to survive the enemy fire despite terror and fear? T
    his is a parallel situation. Any heterosexual couple can "get lucky", technically creating a baby, without forethought, love, preparation, or even desire for that life. Most heterosexual couples can, happily or unhappily, become parents by pure happenstance. For a homosexual couple to become parents...? THAT has to be yearned for, and THAT is where you see the absolute determination to try anything, to give anything, to pay any emotional or monetary price for the joy and honor of parenting.
    The heterosexual couple enjoys the privilege of being either soldier in this analogy. As a general rule, a heterosexual couple can "arrive at the top of the hill" (i.e., become pregnant) with either approach. However, homosexual partners have no privilege; if they are going to be parents, they have to remain focused, disciplined, and negotiate every bit of the way in order to survive the process. Many times, they have to undergo painful medical procedures and to want to be parents almost as much as they want life itself.
    Yes, there are great parents and awful parents of both persuasions, but no one can accuse a gay couple of having gotten pregnant "by mistake." In my extensive personal observations of gay penetrating, the children are often better communicators, more emphatic and more socially advanced than children from a homes that are heterosexual on the outside but struggling with impoverished relationships on the inside.
    Simply put, most of the gay parents I know are incontestably excellent and engaged parents, per a number of measures, and have responsive, socially-conscious and confident children. Many of the straight parents I know are struggling with how to guide with their teens, how to manage conflicts regarding gender roles, how to keep their daughters safe and their sons from acting out, and how to communicate openly and without fear.

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